2018
Cut Worms w/ Shy Boys, Brucemont
July
12
Thursday
Doors 8:30, Show 9pm - $10adv / $12
Tickets, please
Cut Worms
Despite a .300 batting average and a 63 mph curveball from the mound, Cut Worms’ Max Clarke was the black sheep of his baseball-centric, Midwestern family. He was drawn to the creative shadows, drawn to the basement 4-track and late nights in the art studio as much as he was the dugout. He had a born knack for conjuring warm sounds and fine images. His songs in particular crackle with the heat of a love-struck nostalgia: golden threads of storytelling, like visceral memories, woven together with a palpable Everly Brothers’ influence and 50s/60s naiveté. But the kid still has a pretty mean curve. Like one of his creative pillars David Lynch, Clarke’s songs and artwork are also curveballs with a curious underbelly.

A Cut Worms song may impress an innocent summer stroll across fields of tall grass and lavender — but there’s undoubtedly a severed ear out in there in the grass. Some unseen dark forces are always lurking at the edges of songs’ sunbursts. Bright, beautiful lap steel or a cheery harmonica accompaniment often belie an impending doom or crestfallen narrator.

Clarke didn’t necessarily seek out a life as fulltime musician. Before releasing music under the moniker of Cut Worms, Clarke went to school for illustration with the idea of a sensible career in graphic design, then took on a string of handy- man type odd jobs. Still, songwriting – that semi-secret practice Clarke had been cultivating since the age of 12 – kept gnawing at him. It was the only sort of work that didn’t feel like work. Plus, if there’s ever a time to do something as unreliable, unrealistic, and imprudent as throwing yourself wholly into music, might as well be done when you’re in your twenties.

A number of songs that make up his LP, Hollow Ground, bloomed from his time in Chicago during period of driven creativity. In particular, “Like Going Down Sideways” and “Don’t Want To Say Good-Bye” find new life on Hollow Ground, polished from their initial appearances on Cut Worms’ 2017 introductory Alien Sunset EP. Both still fizzle with a lo-fi 60s sound, but cleaned up, they gleam.

The remainder of Hollow Ground was written in Clarke’s current home in Brooklyn, where he still home-demos songs. The record was recorded partially in Los Angeles at the home studio of Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado, and partially in New York with Jason Finkel at Gary’s Electric. Clarke, who plays keyboards, bass, and lap steel in addition to his main guitar, handled most of the instrumentation across the set. He explains he’s always strove toward a specific musical aesthetic, and Hollow Ground marks the closest he’s gotten to hitting it thus far.

Hollow Ground is imbued with a sharp, self-aware lyricism; as strong as the music is here, Clarke shows an affinity for evocative storytelling, striking the balance between cerebral and simplicity. Look no further than the chiming, rollicking standout “Cash For Gold.” For a song with so much sock hop energy, it’s actually about being trapped in one’s introvert head — stuck on the couch or against the wall at the edges of the dance floor.

Sometimes, on Hollow Ground, we find characters impossibly lustful, sometimes brooding, while in other parts they fumble along, hopeful and painfully self-aware. If the music can be said to have any sort of through-line, it revolves around Clarke’s obvious delight in singing his heart out through varying degrees of agony. His songwriting both evokes and explores the raw realm of youth, its weightlessness and possibilities, but channels it through the lens of someone more restrained, who’s been through it all before. Someone who’s old enough to know better but still gets drawn back in to the romanticism of teenage feelings – and knows how to take the listener along, too.
Shy Boys
Being in a band is a sacred thing. Being in a band in 2018 is a sacred thing. Being from the Midwest is a sacred thing. Being in a band that is from the Midwest in 2018...
Consider Shy Boys - DIY local champions of Kansas City, MO, who if you add it all up, are something sacred. Comprised of brothers Collin and Kyle Rausch and best friends Konnor Ervin, Kyle Little and Ross Brown, Shy Boys are the heartland’s answer to The Beach Boys had Alex Chilton been on guitar.
But if a harmony falls into a microphone in the middle of America does anyone really hear it? Some do. Take for instance Shy Boys’ 2014 self- titled debut on local Kansas City label, High Dive Records - I first came across this album while living in Los Angeles and catching wind of a band from my home town that I was told could “actually sing,” and after the first spin, through the muddy fidelity, man, could they actually sing.
On August 3, 2018, the world will see the release of their second record, Bell House, out on legendary and globally cherished record label Polyvinyl, bringing both their profile and music to the surface for the first time. The album’s title is taken from the band’s beloved headquarters - the old house on Bell Street in Kansas City where they lived together for the better part of 5 years.
“‘Lived’ is a loose term,” says lead songwriter Collin. “It was more like a bum den than anything else. There was a giant hole in the floor of the kitchen that had a piece of plywood over it. In the backyard, weeds got like 6 feet high in the summer. It was its own thriving biome. We lived in trash.”
Musically, Collin describes the songs on Bell House taking shape through “a group of guys trying to get through some sort of mutual identity crisis. The lifestyle became overwhelming and really seeped into the music.”
In the time since the release of ST, Collin saw himself falling in love and getting married, leaving the old house on Bell Street, and moving back into his mom’s house with his wife in a suburb of the city. It’s here where the songs of Bell House were born. Being back under the same roof he had grown up in where there was “still writing on the walls from childhood,” Rausch found himself reflective and looking out at his life as a whole.
Take closing track “Champion” for instance, a song Collin says is dedicated to his and Kyle’s mother. “It’s just a note saying that she took care of us when we were young, and now it’s time for us to be there and take care of her.”
The reflective spirit sprinkled throughout the album is also evident on lead single, “Take The Doggie,” a bouncy, guitar driven track centered around wanting to secretly rescue their neighbor’s dog from an abusive owner, or on album highlight “Evil Sin,” which tackles the memory of drummer/bassist Konnor Ervin getting robbed.
But through all of this, Rausch kept his passion in his band, if even for nothing more than to - in his own words - have an excuse to keep hanging out with his brother and best friends. “I have to keep Shy Boys alive to have a regular excuse to hang out with them,” says Collin. “To keep the band alive, I have to write songs. To be able to travel with my buddies, there has to be a new record.”
There is an old term that’s kicked around in country music called a “blood harmony” - in which two people in the same blood line, usually siblings, harmonize with one another in real time. Perhaps that is Shy Boys’ magic touch, putting them just a notch above all the other angels out there in the indie rock choir, and it makes sense, though no longer practicing evangelicals, Collin and Kyle grew up singing besides their parents in their church choir, so their keen sense of harmony is nothing new to them, but instead a life practice devoted to the voice as an instrument.
The result is Bell House, and the result is beautiful. There is something sensitive to the touch about this album, which is perhaps another way of saying that, well - Shy Boys are indeed Shy Boys. I envision the band as a solid unit, with each moving part as an equal. There is a heavy sense of family in everything they do both, literally and figuratively. Bruce Springsteen’s 1980 song “Highway Patrolman” always seems to come to mind;
“Yeah me and Franky out laughing and drinking, Nothing feels better than blood on blood.”
-Kevin Morby
Brucemont
Brucemont is a band from Asheville, North Carolina. Brucemont likes dogs, poetry, laughter, sunsets, and long walks on the beach. Brucemont becomes more powerful each time you say Brucemont
text list
with images
venue info
Oct
18
Thursday

The Moth: True Stories Told Live (Theme: Disguises)



Doors 7, Stories 7:30 - $10

Oct
19
Friday
MC Chris performing MC Chris Is Dead in its entirety !

MC Chris

w/ Dual Core, LEX the Lexicon Artist

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $13adv / $15

Tickets, please
Oct
20
Saturday

Kikagaku Moyo

w/ Sarah Louise

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $12adv / $14

Tickets, please
Oct
22
Monday
Free Mothlight Monday!

Shadow Show (Album Release Show!)

w/ Mr. Mange

9pm - $Free!

Oct
23
Tuesday

Mirah

w/ Tomberlin

Doors 7pm, Show 8pm - $13adv / $15

Tickets, please
Oct
24
Wednesday

Guerilla Toss

w/ Space Heater, Kreamy 'Lectric Santa

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $10adv / $12

Tickets, please
Oct
25
Thursday
Movie Trivia Night!

Casey's Trivia-Drome! **Movie Trivia Night**



8pm

Oct
26
Friday

Annual Halloween Prison Books/Tranzmission Benefit Cover Show



7pm

Oct
27
Saturday

HEX: Halloween Dance Party/Benefit for Southside Community Gardens



8pm - $5+ Suggested Donation

Oct
29
Monday
Free Mothlight Monday!

Delicious

w/ Almuten, Sang Sarah

9pm - $Free!

Oct
30
Tuesday

Days N Daze

w/ The Bridge City Sinners

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $13adv / $15

Tickets, please
Oct
31
Wednesday
Halloween Party with Cover Bands!

Stranger Days (The Doors)

w/ Echo of the Bunnymen (Echo & The Bunnymen), Severed Lips (Dinosaur Jr.), Clasheville USA (The Clash)

Doors 8pm - $Free!

Nov
01
Thursday

The Nude Party

w/ Glove, Kitty Tsunami

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $12adv/ $14

Tickets, please
Nov
02
Friday

John Howie Jr. & The Rosewood Bluff

w/ Rye, Matt Sellars

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $6adv / $8

Tickets, please
Nov
03
Saturday

Slothrust

w/ Mannequin Pussy

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $12adv / $14

Tickets, please
Nov
04
Sunday

Tombs

w/ All Hell

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $10adv/ $12

Tickets, please
Nov
07
Wednesday

Bit Brigade (performing live soundtrack to Mega Man II!)

w/ The Cartridge Family

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $10adv / $12

Tickets, please
Nov
08
Thursday
Worthwhile Sounds Presents...

Vetiver (solo) + Fruit Bats (solo)



Doors 8p, Show 9pm / Seated Show - $15adv/ $18

Tickets, please
Nov
09
Friday

Ian Sweet

w/ Young Jesus

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $12adv / $14

Tickets, please
Nov
10
Saturday

Jack Victor (Single Release Party!)

w/ Kismet

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $5adv/ $8

Tickets, please
Nov
15
Thursday

The Moth: True Stories Told Live (Theme: Beginnings)



Doors 7, Stories 7:30 - $10

Tickets, please
Nov
16
Friday

Amigo The Devil

w/ Harley Poe, The Subtleties

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $10adv / $12

Tickets, please
Nov
23
Friday

Tera Melos

w/ Kortriba, Luxury Club

Doors 8:30, Show 9:30 - $12adv / $14

Tickets, please
Dec
08
Saturday

Flint Eastwood

w/ TBA

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $12adv / $14

Tickets, please
Dec
11
Tuesday

Swearin'

w/ Dark Thoughts

Doors 8:00, Show 9:00 - $12adv/ $14

Tickets, please
Dec
12
Wednesday

Cult Leader

w/ Primitive Weapons, God Mother

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $12adv/ $14

Tickets, please
Dec
15
Saturday
Worthwhile Sounds Presents...

Michael Nau (Cotton Jones)

w/ TBA

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $15adv / $18

Tickets, please
Dec
20
Thursday

The Moth: True Stories Told Live (Theme: Instincts)



Doors 7, Stories 7:30 - $10

Tickets, please
Jan
29
Tuesday

Daniel Romano

w/ T. Hardy Morris

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $12adv/ 15

Tickets, please
Feb
27
Wednesday

Agent Orange

w/ The Last Gang

Doors 8pm, Show 9pm - $15adv/ $18

Tickets, please